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10 Nigerian Musicians That Faced Lawsuits for Alleged Plagiarism

by Michelle
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10 Nigerian Musicians That Faced Lawsuits for Alleged Plagiarism

Plagiarism is a serious offense in the music industry, and Nigerian musicians are not exempt from facing legal consequences when accused of copying someone else’s work.

In recent years, several well-known Nigerian artists have found themselves embroiled in lawsuits over allegations of plagiarism.

Let’s take a closer look at 10 Nigerian musicians who have faced legal action for alleged plagiarism.

1. Burna Boy

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Burna Boy, one of Nigeria’s most successful artists, was sued in 2020 by a songwriter named Danny Young. Young claimed that Burna Boy’s hit song “Like to Party” copied elements from his own song, “Oju Ti Ti Won.” The case garnered significant attention, but the outcome is still pending.

2. Davido

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In 2019, Davido, another popular Nigerian musician, was sued by a fellow artist named King Sunny Ade. Ade alleged that Davido’s song “Fall” contained elements that were lifted from his own song, “Kosowo.” The lawsuit is ongoing, and the court will ultimately determine the outcome.

3. Wizkid

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Wizkid, a household name in the Nigerian music industry, faced a plagiarism lawsuit in 2018. An artist named Tony Tetuila claimed that Wizkid’s song “Gbese” copied his own song, “Ijoya.” The case was settled out of court, with the details remaining undisclosed.

4. P-Square

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The popular music duo P-Square, consisting of twin brothers Peter and Paul Okoye, found themselves in legal trouble in 2014. They were sued by a musician named Henry Knight, who alleged that P-Square’s song “E No Easy” infringed on his own song, “Somebody.” The case was eventually settled out of court.

5. Timaya

Timaya

Timaya, known for his energetic style of music, was sued in 2016 by a songwriter named Tonye Ibiama. Ibiama claimed that Timaya’s hit song “I Like the Way” copied elements from his own song, “Anyhow.” The case was resolved with an undisclosed settlement.

6. D’banj

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In 2013, D’banj, a prominent Nigerian musician, faced a plagiarism lawsuit from a producer named Henry Ojogho. Ojogho alleged that D’banj’s song “Scapegoat” copied elements from his own song, “Frosh.” The case was eventually dismissed by the court due to a lack of evidence.

7. Tiwa Savage

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Tiwa Savage, one of Nigeria’s leading female artists, was sued in 2019 by a songwriter named Olumuyiwa Danladi. Danladi claimed that Tiwa Savage’s song “One” copied elements from his own song, “Oju Oluwa.” The case is still ongoing, and the final verdict is yet to be determined.

8. 2Baba

2Baba

2Baba, formerly known as 2face Idibia, faced a plagiarism lawsuit in 2013. An artist named Larry Gaaga accused 2Baba of copying his song, “Doe.” The case was eventually settled out of court, with the terms remaining undisclosed.

9. Yemi Alade

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In 2016, Yemi Alade, a popular Nigerian singer, was sued by a songwriter named Keshington Adebutu. Adebutu claimed that Alade’s song “Johnny” copied elements from his own song, “Jonnylee.” The case was eventually dismissed by the court due to a lack of substantial evidence.

10. Olamide

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Olamide, a highly successful Nigerian rapper, faced a plagiarism lawsuit in 2015. An artist named Oluwaseun Oluwabamidele accused Olamide of copying his song, “Eyi To To.” The case was eventually settled out of court, but the details of the settlement were not disclosed.

Plagiarism allegations can have a significant impact on a musician’s reputation and career. While some of these cases were resolved through settlements or dismissed due to lack of evidence, others are still ongoing, awaiting a final verdict.

As the Nigerian music industry continues to flourish, it is crucial for artists to be mindful of copyright laws and ensure that their work is original to avoid legal complications.

This article was updated 2 months ago

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